Relationships
Jul31

Relationships

To listen to my interview with Anthony Harris, go here: Share the Light and Love of You in Service to Others by Anthony Harris When I think of relationships, a couple of thoughts come to mind. First, with the right relationship, there is absolutely nothing that cannot be done. Whether the relationship involves family, friends, or colleagues, when individuals create a mutually beneficial and mutually satisfying relationship, those individuals can accomplish some amazing feats. When I think about my own personal and professional accomplishments, I could not have come close to being successful without being in a relationship with someone. Whether it was climbing an 80-foot wall or establishing a mentoring program for at-risk kids, absent the presence of someone who genuinely cared about me and valued our relationship, some important goals in my life would have gone wanting. I am firmly entrenched in the belief in that Swedish Proverb: Shared joy is a double joy; shared sorrow is half a sorrow. The second thought that comes to my mind about relationships is that they can be either resilient, fragile or both. Most strong relationships – the ones built on a solid foundation of trust, respect, and honesty – can amazingly withstand both the ripples and tsunamis that inevitably affect a relationship. Whether there is a minor misunderstanding or a major breach, strong relationships do not accede to the destructiveness of pettiness or succumb to the temptation to end the relationship when stress is placed upon them. Although strong relationships are inherently resilient, their strength can be diminished; and they can suffer chronic and debilitating fragility, if we take them for granted. Because relationships are organic and require the proper amount of nourishment, attention and nurturing, it becomes extremely important to resist taking them for granted. Just as a robust plant can wilt if it does not receive proper nourishment, attention and nurturing, so can relationships. As humans, we frequently get caught up in the busy-ness of life, dealing with deadlines, balancing demands on our time, and otherwise dealing with the daily stressors of life. An unfortunate consequence of that busy-ness is that we can forget to nurture, nourish, and give attention to our relationships. In other words, we can take our relationships for granted and even make erroneous assumptions about them. As Robert Brault pointed out: For lack of an occasional expression of love, a relationship strong at the seams can wear thin in the middle. In my book Gifts of Moments: Being Somebody to Somebody, I recount an incident that prompted me abjure assumptions and instead, reach out to loved ones in an effort to nurture and...

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